Today Show — 34 essential Thanksgiving tips from our all-star chef panel

Today Show — 34 essential Thanksgiving tips from our all-star chef panel

SPREAD MAYO UNDER YOUR TURKEY'S SKIN TO GET IT CRISPY.

You may have heard of rubbing seasoned butter under the skin of the turkey before cooking it to impart moisture and flavor, but chef Roxanne Spruance suggests a different spread: mayonnaise. She seasons mayo with lemon and herbs, roasted garlic or even bacon, then pipes it between the skin and meat. This adds flavor, locks in moisture and helps to crisp the skin, she says.

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CBS This Morning: The Dish

CBS This Morning:  The Dish

Chef Roxanne Spruance had competing interests growing up in Chicago: food and field hockey. But by 22, after a series of unpaid apprenticeships in some of Chicago's top dining restaurants, she had already earned the title of executive chef. In 2010, she moved to New York and into the kitchens of two renowned restaurants: WD-50 and Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Spruance joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss her culinary journey and her New York restaurant, Kingsley.

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Food Republic — Why No-Waste Cooking Is A No Brainer For Roxanne Spruance

Food Republic — Why No-Waste Cooking Is A No Brainer For Roxanne Spruance

Kingsley is a 100 percent landfill-free restaurant, chef and owner Roxanne Spruance tells us. Absolutely nothing comes out of the East Village restaurant and goes to the New York City trash system. Instead, all produce and meat is used, re-used (if possible) or composted. With a decked out resumé including spots like WD~50 and Blue Hill at Stone Barns, to say the Chicago native is familiar with transforming top-notch ingredients into even better and interesting dishes is an understatement. Keeping Kingsley a nearly waste-free restaurant comes naturally with her training and no-waste cooking techniques. She tells us more about how dishes like celeriac agnolotti and Kingsley’s bar program help achieve that landfill-free status.

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Zagat — 13 Under-the-Radar Chefs to Watch in NYC

Zagat — 13 Under-the-Radar Chefs to Watch in NYC

NYC is a mecca for chefs looking to make a name for themselves; but in a city where thousands are trying, only a few rise to the very top. That doesn't mean, however, that there aren't hundreds of crazy-talented chefs flying under the radar, serving up innovative and delicious food just shy of the limelight. Keep your eye on these 13 chefs in 2017.


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Star Chefs — Roxanne Spruance

Star Chefs — Roxanne Spruance

Roxanne Spruance jump-started her career while still in high school in Chicago, apprenticing at Blackbird and working with StarChefs Rising Stars alums Elissa Narrow and Shawn McClain. A student athlete, Spruance excelled in the kitchen and also in field hockey. She was recruited by Michigan State University, where she graduated with dual degrees in environmental biology and zoology and the other in fisheries and wildlife. Spruance also cooked throughout college.      

Shortly after graduating, Spruance picked up her first executive chef gig opening Sopra Bistro, about 90 minutes outside Chi-town in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, where she cooked for more than two years before moving to New York City in 2010. For the next two years she held the position of chef de partie at Wylie Dufresne’s legendary wd~50. Modern techniques and experimental flavor profiles in tow, Spruance followed up one iconic restaurant experience with another, as sous chef at Blue Hill at Stone Barns. Fresh from the gardens upstate, Spruance consulted on the opening of Cafe Tallulah on the Upper West Side, and then joined Alison Eighteen in the Flatiron as executive chef, where she continued to develop her ingredient-focused, nose-to-tail style. That same year, 2013, Spruance competed on and won the Food Network show “Chopped,” the bacon episode.  

In 2016, Spruance opened French-American Kingsley as chef and owner, the culmination of career begun at Blackbird as a teenager.

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Total Food Service — Roxanne Spruance

Total Food Service — Roxanne Spruance

Roxanne Spruance can’t entirely give her family credit for her choice of career.  But she admits that she comes from two sets of grandparents who are terrible cooks. “My 94-year-old grandmother still thinks putting pineapple in green Jello is a great idea,” she says with a laugh.

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‘Chopped’ discovers 'Bacon Baskets!' on Food Network

‘Chopped’ discovers 'Bacon Baskets!' on Food Network

The chefs get some great news before the cooking begins: bacon will be in every basket! In the first one, they find Mangalista bacon and apple chips. Then in the second round, the judges watch to see if the competitors will be able to make dried cherries work with their pork entrees. French toast and bacon are a breakfast classic, but can the final two chefs manage to transform these mystery ingredients into dessert? (Episode: CQ1811H)

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Epoch Times: Gourmet New York

Epoch Times:  Gourmet New York

Alison Eighteen’s chef Roxanne Spruance is new to the French-influenced American restaurant, starting in May, but has already made her mark on the menu. She brings in the lions-share of ingredients for her creations from local farmers’ markets.

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